Posts filed under Type: Boxes & Other

Mother of Pearl Tea Caddy

Mother of Pearl Tea Caddy, Regency Period

23 x 12 x 25cm 

£1750

A beautiful tea caddy, in mother of pearl with red velvet interior, a rare find and in excellent condition and a lovely decorative item. With working lock and key. 

Although wooden Tea Caddies were made early in the 18th century, it is not until the second half of the century that they were introduced  in any numbers as a home style accessory.

The word caddy derives from the Malay "kati" a measure of weight about 3/5 of a kilo. The 17th century tea containers were bottle shaped tea jars in china, glass, silver, enamel and straw-work covered metal. Tea Caddies were made in wood in box form from the second quarter of the 18th century. The first such boxes were shaped like small chests and contained three metal canisters. They were mostly made of mahogany although a few early ones were of walnut. Very occasionally a chinoiserie box was made. Complete boxes of this type are difficult to find, especially in walnut. Chinoiserie boxes are exceedingly rare. 

In England in the 1700s, tea was an expensive commodity. To keep it safe, people would store it in a lockable Tea Chest or Tea Box, which eventually became known as a Tea Caddy.  As tea was too expensive to risk leaving in the presence of servants, the caddy would be kept in the drawing room. Subsequently, the Tea Caddy became an important & fashionable accessory for the home.

Today Tea Caddies are sought after as decorative pieces, in all shapes & forms.

Victorian Walnut & Yew Wood Tea Caddy with Ivory Keyhole

Victorian Walnut & Yew Wood Tea Caddie with Ivory Keyhole

H 15cm W 31cm D 16cm

SOLD

 

Although wooden Tea Caddies were made early in the 18th century, it is not until the second half of the century that they were introduced  in any numbers as a home style accessory.

The word caddy derives from the Malay "kati" a measure of weight about 3/5 of a kilo. The 17th century tea containers were bottle shaped tea jars in china, glass, silver, enamel and straw-work covered metal. Tea Caddies were made in wood in box form from the second quarter of the 18th century. The first such boxes were shaped like small chests and contained three metal canisters. They were mostly made of mahogany although a few early ones were of walnut. Very occasionally a chinoiserie box was made. Complete boxes of this type are difficult to find, especially in walnut. Chinoiserie boxes are exceedingly rare. 

In England in the 1700s, tea was an expensive commodity. To keep it safe, people would store it in a lockable Tea Chest or Tea Box, which eventually became known as a Tea Caddy.  As tea was too expensive to risk leaving in the presence of servants, the caddy would be kept in the drawing room. Subsequently, the Tea Caddy became an important & fashionable accessory for the home.

Today Tea Caddies are sought after as decorative pieces, in all shapes & forms.

 

Period Tea Caddy

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Period Tea Caddy

Height 13cm Width 27cm Depth 

£375

A beautiful period tea caddy with cross banding and star inlay.

Although wooden Tea Caddies were made early in the 18th century, it is not until the second half of the century that they were introduced  in any numbers as a home style accessory.

The word caddy derives from the Malay "kati" a measure of weight about 3/5 of a kilo. The 17th century tea containers were bottle shaped tea jars in china, glass, silver, enamel and straw-work covered metal. Tea Caddies were made in wood in box form from the second quarter of the 18th century. The first such boxes were shaped like small chests and contained three metal canisters. They were mostly made of mahogany although a few early ones were of walnut. Very occasionally a chinoiserie box was made. Complete boxes of this type are difficult to find, especially in walnut. Chinoiserie boxes are exceedingly rare. 

In England in the 1700s, tea was an expensive commodity. To keep it safe, people would store it in a lockable Tea Chest or Tea Box, which eventually became known as a Tea Caddy.  As tea was too expensive to risk leaving in the presence of servants, the caddy would be kept in the drawing room. Subsequently, the Tea Caddy became an important & fashionable accessory for the home.

Today Tea Caddies are sought after as decorative pieces, in all shapes & forms.

Malachite Mounted Mantel Clock Circa. 1840

 

A Malchite Mounted Mantel Clock, French circa 1850.

3 and 3/4 inch enamel dial signed "Martin Baskett and Cie A Paris", similarly signed bell striking movement (bell lacking), the crisply cast case surmounted by a shallow urn with grape finial and above a bacchic mask, flanked by scrolling corbels and raised on a break-front plinth decorated with swags, the front inset with four panels of richly coloured malachite.

 

A Second Empire Gilt and Patinated Bronze Figural Clock Garniture

 

A Second Empire Gilt and Patinated Bronze Figural Clock Garniture

Clock H 48cm W 60cm D 27cm

Candelabra H 72cm, 6 candle holders. 

 

A Second Empire gilt and patinated bronze figural clock garniture. c. 1820-1840
The dial and movement signed Charpentier & Cie, Bronziers, A Paris Rue Charlot, N. 8
the clock formed as a recumbent classical maiden clad in diaphanous draped resting on a water urn, raised on an elaborate acanthus and floriate C and S-scroll cast oval base, the 5" signed enamel Roman dial with outer Arabic five minute track, the signed brass twin train movement with outside countwheel striking on a bell, with pendulum and winder, the six light garniture candelabra formed as seated putti holding aloft floriate rose and lily stems with flowerhead candle nozzles, on corresponding scrolling bases. 
 

William IV Candlesticks c. 1840-1860

A Pair of bronze Victorian Candlesticks c. 1840-60

Empire Style, H 63cm

POA

A beautiful pair of candelabra in the Empire style, of the Victorian era. With five candle holders, an elegant swan rising above and gilt detail on the feet and base foliage.