Posts filed under Type: Equestrian

Jan Peter Verdussen (1700-1763)

Jan Peter Verdussen (1700-1763)

Hunting

Oil on canvas, 21 x 27cm / 35 x 41cm 

Sold to a Private Collector 

A beautiful example of Flemish painting from the eighteenth century, with typical fine detail and rich colour. Verdussen was possibly a member of the famous family of printers from Antwerp but this is not certain. This painting showing such skill in the techinques of oil painting, is obviously by the hand of a well known and expert artist. 

 

J F Herring Jnr. (1820-1907)

John Frederick Herring Junior (1820-1907) 

"The Ploughing Team" 

Oil on Canvas, 74 x 96cm / 98 x 120cm 

SOLD to a Private Collector UK

John F Herring Jnr. was well known for his farm and rural scenes, often with horses, following somewhat in the tradition of his father John Frederick Herring Snr (1795-1865) who was considered to be one of England's greatest Sporting and Equestrian artists, patronized by the English aristocracy. Herring Jnr was expose, through his father's connections, to both great art and wealthy patrons. Three of the four sons of Herring Snr became painters, often collaborating on single paintings. 

 

George Morland (1763-1804)

George Morland (1763-1804)

The White Horse 1790

Signed, Oil on Canvas, 66 x 79cm

POA

A very fine example of the work of one of Britain's most famous 18th Century painters. George Morland lived a very full and prolific life. He exhibited at the Royal Academy at the very young age of 10, and escaping from his father and taskmaster who apparently kept him virtual prisoner, making him draw and then selling his works and keeping the money, he went to Margate where he continued and developed his taste for a rollicking lifestyle of excess. 

Morland is infamous both for his excesses and for his skill as a draughtsman and his works are extremely sought after and well represented in National museums and private collections. 

This particular painting is exemplary of Morland's artistry in its' detail, composition, size and colour and included here a white horse, somewhat of a signatory of Morland's. 

 

 

Richard Barrett Davis (1782-1854)

Richard Barrett Davis (1782-1854)

Sir Roger De Coverly and his Hounds 1843

Signed, Oil on Canvas, 90 x 116cm

Richard Barrett Davis was an important Victorian Horse painter and landscape artist, born in Watford in 1782. In 1789 his father became a huntsman to George III's private harriers and it was through him that Davis' sketches caught the attention of George III who in turn persuaded Sir Francis Bourgeois (1756-1807) to tutor the young Barrett Davis. 

He studied at the Royal Academy Schools where he first exhibited in 1802. He joined the Society of British Artists in 1829 and was appointed animal painter to William IV in 1831. 

From 1802 Davis exhibited annually at the Royal Academy for the next fifty years and from 1808 he exhibited at the British Institution and also at the Society of British Arts in 1831. The subject of this painting was also the name of a loveable if slightly ridiculous English Squire character from the Spectator (1711) who represented the values of an old country gentleman, making typical Tory politics of such a person harmless but silly. It is also the name of an English country dance. 

William Barraud (1810-1850)

William Barraud (1810-1850)

Richard Crawshay talking to his Gamekeeper in the Grounds of Ottershaw Park, Chertsey  

Signed and dated 1838

Oil on Canvas 

105 x 134.5cm / 127 x 154 cm Framed 

POA

Provenance:

Arthur Ackermann & Son Ltd, London, 1934;John Marquess of Bute (1881 - 1947), by family descent until 1999;Richard Green, London;Private Collection since 2000 Exhibited:London, Royal Academy, 1838, no. 461 (Scene in Ottershaw Park, Surrey, with Portraits).Richard Crayshaw (1786-1859) was the eldest son of the famous ironmaster William Crawshay (1764-1834) of Cyfarthfa Castle, Glamorgan and Stoke Newington, Middlesex, and his wife Eliza Couzens (d. 1825). The Crayshaw family owned the great ironworks at Merthyr Tydfil in south Wles, which had been founded by Richard Crayshaw's grandfather, also called Richard. Richard's younger brother William (1788- 1867), who lived at Caversham Park near Reading, became sole proprietor of the Cyfarthfa works upon the death of their grandfather in 1810.

A decisive and brilliant man, William hugely expanded the family business as the expansion of the railways led to increased demand for iron. Richard Crawshaw shared in this prosperity although he seems to have preferred the life of a country gentleman to that of an ironmaster. His Gentleman's Magazine obituary stated that he 'derived from his father a large share in the great ironworks at Cyfarthfa, Merthyr Tydfil, but of late years had retired on a very ample fortune' (July 1859).

Crawshay married Mary, daughter of Francis Homfrey of Hyde, Staffordshire, with whom he had four sons and eight daughters. He lived at Rowfant, Sussex and then leased Honnington hall, Norfolk, from Lord Bayning. Barraud's painting shows him in the grounds of Ottershaw Park, Chertsey, Surrey, which he leased and finally acquired in 1842. Ottershaw was built for Sir Thomas Sewell soon after 1761 by Sir Robert Taylor.

Artist biography:

William Barraud (1810 – 1 Oct 1850) was an English animal painter and illustrator, the brother of Henry Barraud, with whom he collaborated on many works.William was born in Lambeth in London, one of 17 children of William Francis Barraud (1783–1833), a clerk in the Custom House, and Sophia (née) Hull. His paternal grandfather was Paul Philip Barraud, an eminent chronometer maker in Cornhill, and his maternal grandfather, Thomas Hull, a miniature painter. The family was of French Huguenot origin that had come over to England at the time of the revocation of the Edict of Nantes. His younger brother Henry Barraud was also a notable artist, and another, Edward, though talented in art did not take it up as a profession.

On leaving school he is said to have become a clerk in the Custom House where his father worked (although there are no records of this), but eventually became a pupil of artist Abraham Cooper. As an animal artist he specialised in painting horses and dogs, exhibiting at the Royal Academy from 1829–50, the British Institution from 1828–49, the Society of British Artists and at other venues. His work was popular with huntsman and dog-fanciers. He also produced some historical and landscape paintings.

William shared a studio, from 1835 until his untimely death, with his brother Henry, and collaborated on many subject pictures with himself painting the animals and Henry the figures. Several of these joint works were exhibited at the Royal Academy. The brothers also produced a book together entitled "Sketches of Figures and Animals" (H. Graves and Co. c. 1850). William also collaborated on another book with fellow artist Thomas Fairland (1804–52) called "The book of animals drawn from nature" (C. Tilt, 1846).

In 1841 William married Mary Ratliff and they had a son Clement William (1843–1926), who went on to become a stained-glass designer (for Lavers, Barraud and Westlake), a Jesuit priest, poet and playwright. Mary died soon after the birth and in 1850 William married Margaret Harrison.William died in Kensington, London from dysentery and typhoid fever on 1 October 1850, in his fortieth year.

 

Roland Wheelwright (1870-1955)

Roland Wheelwright (1870-1955)

Rider and Horse

Oil on Board, 29 x 39cm / 40 x 47cm 

POA

The painter Roland Wheelwright, born in Queensland, Australia, came, while very young to England, and after attending Tonbridge School, went to Herkomer’s School in Bushey. Lucy Kemp-Welch studied there at the same time, and like her, Wheelwright settled in the area (first Watford, then in Bushey itself), and painted a lot of horses. He exhibited at the Royal Academy from 1895 all the way through till 1930. His work falls into three areas. Firstly, historical and romantic paintings in a realist style, usually choosing subjects with an excuse to feature horses, such as Don Quixote, and perhaps his best known painting, Joan of Arc taken Prisoner (1906). Later in his career he cut out the literature and produced rather conventional though bright pictures of horses in rustic surroundings, without any story. His third subject area was rather different – girls in Edwardian swimsuits, bathing or boating or sunning themselves. These latter were rather characteristic – short-haired rather than long-haired, as we might expect for Edwardians, and normally rather buxom figures, the curves emphasized by the folded drapery, which is treated with some care.

Wheelwright also did a fair amount of illustrative work, including Dickens, Scott, Dumas and the works of other great literary figures.

J F Herring Jnr (1820-1907)

J F Herring Jnr. (1820-1907)

Farmyard Scene

Oil on Canvas, 34 x 49cm / 50 x 66cm 

SOLD to Private Collector UK 

John F Herring Jnr. was well known for his farm and rural scenes, often with horses, following somewhat in the tradition of his father John Frederick Herring Snr (1795-1865) who was considered to be one of England's greatest Sporting and Equestrian artists, patronized by the English aristocracy. Herring Jnr was exposed, through his father's connections, to both great art and wealthy patrons. Three of the four sons of Herring Snr became painters, often collaborating on single paintings. 

A collectable artist whose works are well represented in Museum and Private Collections alike. 

J F Herring (Jnr) (1820-1907)

J F Herring Jnr. (1820-1907)

Farmyard Scene

Oil on Canvas, 29 x 40cm / 41 x 51cm 

SOLD to a Private Collector UK 

John F Herring Jnr. was well known for his farm and rural scenes, often with horses, following somewhat in the tradition of his father John Frederick Herring Snr (1795-1865) who was considered to be one of England's greatest Sporting and Equestrian artists, patronized by the English aristocracy. Herring Jnr was exposed, through his father's connections, to both great art and wealthy patrons. Three of the four sons of Herring Snr became painters, often collaborating on single paintings. 

A collectable artist whose works are well represented in Museum and Private Collections alike. 

Frederick Hulme (1816-1884)

Frederick William Hulme (1816-1884)

Horses Watering

Oil on Canvas, 74 x 124cm / 95 x 146cm

Acquired by a Private Collector, UK

Frederick William Hulme was an English landscape painter and illustrator, born in Yorkshire, he first exhibited in Birmingham in 1841. His son, Frederick Edward Hulme, became a notable teacher, writer and amateur botanist known for his drawings of flowers. Hulme is known for his landscape paintings of Surrey and Wales.

In 1844 Hulme moved to London where he worked designing for publications such as "The Art Journal. and as a teacher of drawing and painting.  He illustrated a number of books including Edgar Allan Poe's Poetical Works of E. A. Poe in 1853, and Samuel Carter Hall's Book of South Wales in 1861and worked in conjunction with other artists, including Henry Brittan Willis.

Hulme exhibited at the Royal Academy from 1852 to 1884, the British Institution from 1845 to 1862, the Royal Manchester Institution and other smaller galleries.

In 2002, an 1865 Hulme landscape, "Sheep resting in a woodland glade" sold for £33,000 at Christie's auction house, London.