Posts filed under Type: Print

Francis Bacon (1909-1992)

Francis Bacon (1909-1992)

George Dyer Accroupi

1996 November, DLM No 62, Deluxe Edition of 150, signed Francis Bacon

37 x 27cm / 63 x 53cm 

SOLD

Francis Bacon, one of Britain's most famous and infamous artists of the 20th Century, prolific and renowned for his engaging, charismatic and perhaps volatile character. He was extremely articulate and well read, and today his work is collected and sought after. 

This image showing his lover George Dyer crouching, is important, bearing in mind the tragic death of Dyer, Bacon's lover, in 1971. As from this point on Bacon and his art became darker,  more introspective and preoccupied with the passage of time and death. 

 

 

Patrick Hughes (b. 1939)

Patrick Hughes (b. 1939) 

'Turner'

Reverspective Print, Printer's Proof, Signed

H 43cm W 89cm D 17.5cm

 

Patrick Hughes is a British artist working in London. He is the creator of "reverspective", an optical illusion on a 3-dimensional surface where the parts of the picture which seem farthest away are actually physically the nearest.

Patrick Hughes was born in Birmingham, went to school in Hull and went on at the James Graham Day College in Leeds in 1959. Later he taught at the Leeds College of Art before becoming an independent artist. He has three sons by his first wife, Rennie Paterson, and was later married to the author Molly Parkin. Hughes lives above his studio near Old Street, London, with his third wife, the historian and biographer Diane Atkinson[

Hughes' early works were often playful, putting things back to front or squashing them flat, like Clown (1963) and Liquorice Allsorts (1960), setting words against images, like One Two (1962), or against themselves, like Tick Cross (1962). He explored visual oxymorons and paradoxes. His fascination with the illusion of perspective began with works like Infinity (1963), Three Doors (1964) and The Space Ruler (1965).

His first "reverse perspective" or "reverspective" was Sticking Out Room (1964), which was a life-size room for the Institute of Contemporary Arts (ICA) in 1970.

He explains reverspective:

Reverspectives are three-dimensional paintings that when viewed from the front initially give the impression of viewing a painted flat surface that shows a perspective view. However as soon as the viewer moves their head even slightly the three dimensional surface that supports the perspective view accentuates the depth of the image and accelerates the shifting perspective far more than the brain normally allows. This provides a powerful and often disorienting impression of depth and movement. The illusion is made possible by painting the view in reverse to the relief of the surface, that is, the bits that stick farthest out from the painting are painted with the most distant part of the scene.

 

 

Patrick Hughes (b. 1939)

Patrick Hughes (b. 1939) 

'Compendium'

Reverspective Print, Artist's Proof, Signed. 

H 43cm W 90cm D 20cm 

 

Patrick Hughes is a British artist working in London. He is the creator of "reverspective", an optical illusion on a 3-dimensional surface where the parts of the picture which seem farthest away are actually physically the nearest.

Patrick Hughes was born in Birmingham, went to school in Hull and went on at the James Graham Day College in Leeds in 1959. Later he taught at the Leeds College of Art before becoming an independent artist. He has three sons by his first wife, Rennie Paterson, and was later married to the author Molly Parkin. Hughes lives above his studio near Old Street, London, with his third wife, the historian and biographer Diane Atkinson[

Hughes' early works were often playful, putting things back to front or squashing them flat, like Clown (1963) and Liquorice Allsorts (1960), setting words against images, like One Two (1962), or against themselves, like Tick Cross (1962). He explored visual oxymorons and paradoxes. His fascination with the illusion of perspective began with works like Infinity (1963), Three Doors (1964) and The Space Ruler (1965).

His first "reverse perspective" or "reverspective" was Sticking Out Room (1964), which was a life-size room for the Institute of Contemporary Arts (ICA) in 1970.

He explains reverspective:

Reverspectives are three-dimensional paintings that when viewed from the front initially give the impression of viewing a painted flat surface that shows a perspective view. However as soon as the viewer moves their head even slightly the three dimensional surface that supports the perspective view accentuates the depth of the image and accelerates the shifting perspective far more than the brain normally allows. This provides a powerful and often disorienting impression of depth and movement. The illusion is made possible by painting the view in reverse to the relief of the surface, that is, the bits that stick farthest out from the painting are painted with the most distant part of the scene.

 

 

Antique Map of Lincoln

Antique Map of Lincoln 

65 x 72cm

A beautifully colourful antique map showing the Heraldic Arms for those 'noble families that have borne the dignitiye and title of Earles of Lyncolne since the tyme of the Normane conquest'.

'The Countie and citie of Lyncolne described with the armes of them that have bene Earles thereof since the Conquest.'

Antique Map of Lincoln/Norfolk Circa. 1610

Antique Map showing Lincolnia bordering Yorkeshire, Norfolke, Cambridgeshire, Leicestershire & Northamptonshire

Reverse shows 

55 x 63cm

Lovely framed antique map with heraldic shields for the families of de Lacey, de Quincy, de Romer, de Gant, de la Poole, Brandon, Clynton. 

 

Francis Bacon (1909-1992)

Francis Bacon (1909-1992)

George Dyer fixant un cordon de rideau

DLM No 162 1966 November Deluxe Edition of 150, Signed Francis Bacon

37 x 27cm / 63 x 53cm

SOLD

Francis Bacon, one of Britain's most famous and infamous artists of the 20th Century, prolific and renowned for his engaging, charismatic and perhaps volatile character. He was extremely articulate and well read, and today his work is collected and sought after. 

This image showing his lover George Dyer crouching, is important, bearing in mind the tragic death of Dyer, Bacon's lover, in 1971. As from this point on Bacon and his art became darker,  more introspective and preoccupied with the passage of time and death.