Posts filed under decorative

Japanese Imari Charger Circa 1900.

Japanese Imari Charger Plate circa. 1900

D 30cm

£275.00

Imari porcelain is the name for Japanese porcelain wares made in the town of Arita, in the former Hizen Province, northwestern Kyūshū. They were exported to Europe extensively from the port of Imari, Saga, between the second half of the 17th century and the first half of the 18th century. Imari or Arita porcelain has been continuously produced up through the present day.

Typically the colours used are cobalt blue with red and gold. While subject matter is varied with foliage and flowers, people, genre scenes and pattern.  Most designs are uniquely Japanese owing to the rich Japanese tradition of paintings and costume design. The porcelain has a gritty texture on the bases, where it is not covered by glaze. There is also blue and white Imari. 

Mother of Pearl Tea Caddy

Mother of Pearl Tea Caddy, Regency Period

23 x 12 x 25cm 

£1750

A beautiful tea caddy, in mother of pearl with red velvet interior, a rare find and in excellent condition and a lovely decorative item. With working lock and key. 

Although wooden Tea Caddies were made early in the 18th century, it is not until the second half of the century that they were introduced  in any numbers as a home style accessory.

The word caddy derives from the Malay "kati" a measure of weight about 3/5 of a kilo. The 17th century tea containers were bottle shaped tea jars in china, glass, silver, enamel and straw-work covered metal. Tea Caddies were made in wood in box form from the second quarter of the 18th century. The first such boxes were shaped like small chests and contained three metal canisters. They were mostly made of mahogany although a few early ones were of walnut. Very occasionally a chinoiserie box was made. Complete boxes of this type are difficult to find, especially in walnut. Chinoiserie boxes are exceedingly rare. 

In England in the 1700s, tea was an expensive commodity. To keep it safe, people would store it in a lockable Tea Chest or Tea Box, which eventually became known as a Tea Caddy.  As tea was too expensive to risk leaving in the presence of servants, the caddy would be kept in the drawing room. Subsequently, the Tea Caddy became an important & fashionable accessory for the home.

Today Tea Caddies are sought after as decorative pieces, in all shapes & forms.

Japanese Imari Jardiniere 19th Century

Japanese Imari Jardiniere 19th Century

H 25cm D 26cm 

£1,250

Imari porcelain is the name for Japanese porcelain wares made in the town of Arita, in the former Hizen Province, northwestern Kyūshū. They were exported to Europe extensively from the port of Imari, Saga, between the second half of the 17th century and the first half of the 18th century. Imari or Arita porcelain has been continuously produced up through the present day.

Typically the colours used are cobalt blue with red and gold. While subject matter is varied with foliage and flowers, people, genre scenes and pattern.  Most designs are uniquely Japanese owing to the rich Japanese tradition of paintings and costume design. The porcelain has a gritty texture on the bases, where it is not covered by glaze. There is also blue and white Imari. 

Jules Moigniez (1835-1894)

Jules Moigniez (1835-1894)

A Pair of Pheasants 

Bronze, Signed, H 55cm W 50cm D 27cm 

SOLD

 

Moigniez was a French animalier sculptor who worked during the 19th Century. His output was primarily in cast bronze and he frequently exhibited his sculptures at the Paris Salon. He was best known for his bronzes depicting birds, although his skill and versatility enabled him to produce quality horse sculptures (racehorses), dog sculptures and hunting scenes.

His bird sculptures were among the finest ever created in his time.

 

Victorian Walnut & Yew Wood Tea Caddy with Ivory Keyhole

Victorian Walnut & Yew Wood Tea Caddie with Ivory Keyhole

H 15cm W 31cm D 16cm

SOLD

 

Although wooden Tea Caddies were made early in the 18th century, it is not until the second half of the century that they were introduced  in any numbers as a home style accessory.

The word caddy derives from the Malay "kati" a measure of weight about 3/5 of a kilo. The 17th century tea containers were bottle shaped tea jars in china, glass, silver, enamel and straw-work covered metal. Tea Caddies were made in wood in box form from the second quarter of the 18th century. The first such boxes were shaped like small chests and contained three metal canisters. They were mostly made of mahogany although a few early ones were of walnut. Very occasionally a chinoiserie box was made. Complete boxes of this type are difficult to find, especially in walnut. Chinoiserie boxes are exceedingly rare. 

In England in the 1700s, tea was an expensive commodity. To keep it safe, people would store it in a lockable Tea Chest or Tea Box, which eventually became known as a Tea Caddy.  As tea was too expensive to risk leaving in the presence of servants, the caddy would be kept in the drawing room. Subsequently, the Tea Caddy became an important & fashionable accessory for the home.

Today Tea Caddies are sought after as decorative pieces, in all shapes & forms.

 

Gilt & Turquoise Sevres Vase Circa.1940-1950

Gilt & Turquoise Sevres Vase circa. 1940-1950

Height 121cm / Width 45cm 

£3000

Sevres porcelain has been made in Sevres, France, since 1769. Many copies of the famous ware have been made. The name originally referred to the works of the Royal Porcelain factory. The name now includes any of the wares made in the town of Sevres, France. Sevres porcelains are known for their quality, design, and enamel decorations in colors like royal blue, turquoise, rose, and gold. 

This large vase shows two beautiful hand painted illustrations on either side of typical genre scenes. Stunning colours and gilt detail in excellent condition. 

Japanese Imari Charger Plate Circa. 1850-1860

Japanese Imari Charger Plate 

D 30cm 

£395.00

Imari porcelain is the name for Japanese porcelain wares made in the town of Arita, in the former Hizen Province, northwestern Kyūshū. They were exported to Europe extensively from the port of Imari, Saga, between the second half of the 17th century and the first half of the 18th century. Imari or Arita porcelain has been continuously produced up through the present day.

Typically the colours used are cobalt blue with red and gold. While subject matter is varied with foliage and flowers, people, genre scenes and pattern.  Most designs are uniquely Japanese owing to the rich Japanese tradition of paintings and costume design. The porcelain has a gritty texture on the bases, where it is not covered by glaze. There is also blue and white Imari. 

Pierre Jules Mene (1810-1879)

Pierre Jules Mene (1810-1879)

Hunting Dogs. Circa. 1870

38 x 18 x 23cm Bronze, signed

SOLD

P J Mêne is famous as a French animalières who produced a number of animal sculptures,   including horses, cows and bulls, sheep and goats which were in vogue during the Second Empire. His contemporaries included such well known names as Rosa Bonheur, Paul-Edouard Delabrierre, Pierre Louis Rouillard, Antoine-Louis Barye. As he specialized in small bronzes you will never sees his artistry as public monument. He was very successful in his day, popular with the bourgeois class. Mêne is considered to be the lost-wax casting expert of his time.  

This is an original bronze, cast in his lifetime which makes it of particular interest. The subject matter of dogs is very popular, here showing a retriever and a pointer at work out hunting. 

 

Period Tea Caddy

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Period Tea Caddy

Height 13cm Width 27cm Depth 

£375

A beautiful period tea caddy with cross banding and star inlay.

Although wooden Tea Caddies were made early in the 18th century, it is not until the second half of the century that they were introduced  in any numbers as a home style accessory.

The word caddy derives from the Malay "kati" a measure of weight about 3/5 of a kilo. The 17th century tea containers were bottle shaped tea jars in china, glass, silver, enamel and straw-work covered metal. Tea Caddies were made in wood in box form from the second quarter of the 18th century. The first such boxes were shaped like small chests and contained three metal canisters. They were mostly made of mahogany although a few early ones were of walnut. Very occasionally a chinoiserie box was made. Complete boxes of this type are difficult to find, especially in walnut. Chinoiserie boxes are exceedingly rare. 

In England in the 1700s, tea was an expensive commodity. To keep it safe, people would store it in a lockable Tea Chest or Tea Box, which eventually became known as a Tea Caddy.  As tea was too expensive to risk leaving in the presence of servants, the caddy would be kept in the drawing room. Subsequently, the Tea Caddy became an important & fashionable accessory for the home.

Today Tea Caddies are sought after as decorative pieces, in all shapes & forms.

Malachite Mounted Mantel Clock Circa. 1840

 

A Malchite Mounted Mantel Clock, French circa 1850.

3 and 3/4 inch enamel dial signed "Martin Baskett and Cie A Paris", similarly signed bell striking movement (bell lacking), the crisply cast case surmounted by a shallow urn with grape finial and above a bacchic mask, flanked by scrolling corbels and raised on a break-front plinth decorated with swags, the front inset with four panels of richly coloured malachite.