Posts filed under 19th century

John Arthur Lomax (1857-1923)

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John Arthur Lomax (1857-1923)

The Debate

Oil on Panel, 29 x 44cm / 42 x 57cm

POA

Born in Manchester in 1857, Lomax studied at the Munich Academy in Stuttgart before returning to Manchester and finally to London. His paintings are mainly historical genre subjects with particular interest in the Civil War period, often with dramatic and sentimental quality. He is much noted for his ability to render in great detail individual expression and differences in quality of textures. This is a small and exquisite painting that keeps the viewer entranced with its clever composition, drama and detail. A fine example that great paintings come in all sizes. Lomax exhibited at The Royal Society of British Artists, Birmingham, Walker Art Gallery, Liverpool, Manchester City Art Gallery, The Royal Academy and the Royal Institute of Oil Painters. 

James Ward (1769-1859)

James Ward (1769-1859)

Fighting Dogs

Oil on Canvas, 29 x 34cm / 42 x 47cm

Born in London, and younger brother of William Ward the engraver, James Ward was influenced by many people, but his career is conventionally divided into two periods: until 1803, his single greatest influence was his brother in law George Morland; from that time, it was Rubens. From 1810 or so, Ward started to paint horses within landscapes; slightly later, he turned to very large-scale landscapes, of which Gordale Scar (Tate, London), completed in 1814 or 1815 and depicting Gordale Scar (Yorkshire) as an example of thesublime, is considered his masterpiece and a masterpiece of English Romantic painting.

James Ward was one of the outstanding artists of the day, his singular style and great skill set him above most of his contemporaries, markedly influencing the growth of British art. Regarded as one of the great animal painters of his time, James produced history paintings, portraits, landscapes and genre. He started off as an engraver, trained by William, who later engraved much of his work. The partnership of William and James Ward produced the best that English art had to offer, their great technical skill and artistry having led to images that reflect the grace and charm of the era. He was admitted for membership into the Royal Academy in 1811.

One of Ward's best-known paintings,The deer stealer, was commissioned in 1823 for the sum of 500 guineas by Ward's patron Theophilus Levett. When the work was finished, Levett pronounced himself delighted with the results, and consequently raised the remuneration to 600 guineas. Subsequently Ward was said to have been offered 1,000 guineas for the painting by 'a nobleman,' which he declined. The painting now hangs at Tate in London.

Edward Williams Senior ( 1782-1855)

Edward Williams Senior ( 1782-1855)

Landscape with Cathedral

POA

Oil on Canvas, 75 x 62cm / 102 x 89cm Framed, Original Frame

Edward Williams Senior (1782-1855), father of the well known Williams family of painters and founder of the Barnes School, was popular and successful as a landscape painter during the Victorian era. The Williams family paintings are characterised by genre scenes typical of the English landscapes of their time. Interestingly the fact that the figures and objects in his landscapes take second place to the skilled rendering of light and shadows parallels the attitude to portrait painters over landscape painters during this time. 

The Williams family of painters were popular in their own times and are well represented in collections across the country.

After Claude Lorrain (circa. 1604 - 1682)

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After Claude Lorrain (circa. 1604 - 1682) 

'Capriccio'

Oil on Canvas, 132 x 100cm / 149 x 115cm

Claude Lorrain, born Gellee, in Vosges in Lorraine - then the Duchy of Lorraine, an independent state until 1766, one of five children, orphaned at twelve, went to live at Freiburg then moved to Rome and then to Naples, where he apprenticed for two years, from 1619 to 1621, under Goffredo (Gottfried) Wals. In 1625, returning to Rome he  became apprenticed to Augustin Tassi. He toured widely through Italy, France and Germany and at Nancy he painted architectural subjects on the ceiling of the Carmelite church. In 1627 Lorrain returned to Rome. Two landscapes made for Cardinal Bentivoglio earned him the patronage of Pope Urban VIII. From about 1637 he rapidly achieved fame as a painter of landscapes and seascapes. He apparently befriended his fellow Frenchman Nicolas Poussin; together they would travel the Roman Campagna, sketching landscapes. 

In order to avoid repetition of subjects, and also to expose the many spurious copies of his works, he made tinted outline drawings (in six paper books prepared for this purpose) of all those pictures sent to different countries; and on the back of each drawing he wrote the name of the purchaser. These volumes he named the Liber Veritatis (Book of Truth). This valuable work, engraved and published, has always been highly esteemed by students of the art of landscape. 

Landscape as a subject was considered unclassical and secular. Pure landscape, like pure still life painting or genre, was considered lacking in moral seriousness - in comparison to the prized mythic or religious scenes of this time. 

In this matter of the importance of landscape, Lorrain was prescient. Living in a pre-Romantic era, he did not depict those uninhabited panoramas that were to be esteemed in later centuries, such as with Salvatore Rosa. He painted a pastoral world of fields and valleys not distant from castles and towns. If the ocean horizon is represented, it is from the setting of a busy port. Perhaps to feed the public need for paintings with noble themes, his pictures include demigods, heroes and saints, even though his abundant drawings and sketchbooks prove that he was more interested in scenography.

John Constable described Claude Lorrain as "the most perfect landscape painter the world ever saw", and declared that in Claude's landscape "all is lovely - all amiable - all is amenity and repose; the calm sunshine of the heart". (From Wikipedia)

Mother of Pearl Tea Caddy

Mother of Pearl Tea Caddy, Regency Period

23 x 12 x 25cm 

SOLD

A beautiful tea caddy, in mother of pearl with red velvet interior, a rare find and in excellent condition and a lovely decorative item. With working lock and key. 

Although wooden Tea Caddies were made early in the 18th century, it is not until the second half of the century that they were introduced  in any numbers as a home style accessory.

The word caddy derives from the Malay "kati" a measure of weight about 3/5 of a kilo. The 17th century tea containers were bottle shaped tea jars in china, glass, silver, enamel and straw-work covered metal. Tea Caddies were made in wood in box form from the second quarter of the 18th century. The first such boxes were shaped like small chests and contained three metal canisters. They were mostly made of mahogany although a few early ones were of walnut. Very occasionally a chinoiserie box was made. Complete boxes of this type are difficult to find, especially in walnut. Chinoiserie boxes are exceedingly rare. 

In England in the 1700s, tea was an expensive commodity. To keep it safe, people would store it in a lockable Tea Chest or Tea Box, which eventually became known as a Tea Caddy.  As tea was too expensive to risk leaving in the presence of servants, the caddy would be kept in the drawing room. Subsequently, the Tea Caddy became an important & fashionable accessory for the home.

Today Tea Caddies are sought after as decorative pieces, in all shapes & forms.

Benjamin Williams Leader (1831-1923)

Benjamin Williams Leader (1831-1923) 

On the River Llugwy

Oil on Canvas, 60 x 42cm / 88 x 68cm

Benjamin Williams Leader was born in Worcester, his father was a keen amateur artist - a friend of Constables, and studied art at Worcester School of Design and later at the Royal Academy. The surrounding countryside to where he lived served as his early inspiration, the picturesque villages and churches, the fields and rivers. His work proved very popular and he sold successfully. He was a regular exhibitor at the RA. 1859 proved to be his most successful year yet, exhibiting his 'A Quiet Pool in Glen Falloch',  following a trip to Scotland, Leader' s work was bought by Agnew's and was now going to private galleries rather than being exhibited publicly.

He painted the landscapes and scenes between the Severn Valley, Worcestershire, and Wales, in particular, exhibited to much acclaim at the RA 1865, was 'Autumn's Last Gleam' and later in 1881 'February Fill Dyke', following which he became an associate (ARA) and then a Royal Academician (RA) in 1898.

His works are represented in many museum and private collections. 

 

 

Arthur H Rigg (1868-1947)

Arthur H Rigg (1868-1947)

A Scottish Landscape

Oil on Canvas, 112 x 76cm / 146 x 110cm

Arthur H Rigg was a British painter well known for his beautiful landscapes. This work sits within a gilt period frame and would make a lovely statement piece for any room. 

  

Arthur A Davis (1877-1905)

Arthur A Davis, (British fl 1877-1905),

'Resting' 

Framed watercolour, signed, 59 x 47cm / 36 x 26cm

Arthur A Davis was well known for his dogs, his name is synonymous with Victorian sporting art. As a set of four, these paintings make a beautiful group, signed and dated by the artist. 

George F Papperitz (1846-1918)

George F Pappertiz (1846-1918)

Portrait of a Beautiful Lady 

70 x 58cm / 93 x 82cm

George F Papperitz was a well known German artist whose skill and technique is exemplified in this beautiful and sensitive work. 

Japanese Imari Jardiniere 19th Century

Japanese Imari Jardiniere 19th Century

H 25cm D 26cm 

Imari porcelain is the name for Japanese porcelain wares made in the town of Arita, in the former Hizen Province, northwestern Kyūshū. They were exported to Europe extensively from the port of Imari, Saga, between the second half of the 17th century and the first half of the 18th century. Imari or Arita porcelain has been continuously produced up through the present day.

Typically the colours used are cobalt blue with red and gold. While subject matter is varied with foliage and flowers, people, genre scenes and pattern.  Most designs are uniquely Japanese owing to the rich Japanese tradition of paintings and costume design. The porcelain has a gritty texture on the bases, where it is not covered by glaze. There is also blue and white Imari. 

Jules Moigniez (1835-1894)

Jules Moigniez (1835-1894)

A Pair of Pheasants 

Bronze, Signed, H 55cm W 50cm D 27cm 

SOLD

 

Moigniez was a French animalier sculptor who worked during the 19th Century. His output was primarily in cast bronze and he frequently exhibited his sculptures at the Paris Salon. He was best known for his bronzes depicting birds, although his skill and versatility enabled him to produce quality horse sculptures (racehorses), dog sculptures and hunting scenes.

His bird sculptures were among the finest ever created in his time.

 

William Mulready (1786-1863)

William Mulready (1786-1863)

Crossing the Ford

Oil on Canvas 28 x 23cm / 17 x 13cm

This beautiful oil sketch was done by Mulready in preparation for work his well known painting 'The Ford', painted at the height of his artistic career and hanging in the Tate, London, and which was exhibited to critical acclaim at the Royal Academy in 1842. A writer in the Art Union observed: ‘(The Ford) sustains the high reputation of its author; it is a work of surpassing beauty, grace and excellence – one of the most valuable paintings ever produced in England’ (Art Union, 1842, p.121).

'The painting is a closely-observed rural scene. A young girl is carried across a stream by two youths; their traveling companions wait in the shadows on foot and horseback and prepare to cross behind them. The background landscape is hilly and rocky, opening up to a distant blue horizon. As with Mulready’s other narrative works of the period, this rural idyll is imbued with symbolic meaning. The lyrical intensity of the scene and the close psychological connection between the three central figures echoes the theme of courtship Mulready explored in 1839 inThe Sonnet and First Love (both Victoria and Albert Museum, London). The theme of crossing water illustrating a rite of passage to adulthood was a familiar one, used by J.M.W. Turner (1775–1851) and other nineteenth-century artists and writers. Pointon (p.166) notes the painting’s implicit eroticism, acceptable to the Victorian spectator by virtue of its rural, Arcadian setting. A critic writing in 1852 remarked that the painting was: ‘composed into a charming bit of rusticity, treated with much purity of taste and feeling. The subject is one that might very easily have been vulgarised, though it was perfectly safe on that score in the hands of Mr. Mulready.’ (Art Journal, May 1852, p.158.) ' The Tate Gallery. 

Mulready gained a reputation for his innovative use of colour combining ‘the greatest quantity of light consistent with the greatest quantity of colour’ (quoted in Heleniak, p.136).  Mulready’s approach to colour was undoubtedly influenced by seeing works by the Venetian painters Titian (c.1485–1576) and Tintoretto (1518–94) at the British Institution ‘Old Masters’ exhibition of 1815. 

‘The works completed by him between 1839 and 1848 are the most perfect in story, colour and execution of any of his productions. The chiaroscuro is excellent, the colour rich and jewel-like, the execution refined and perfect of its kind.’ (Richard and Samuel Redgrave, A Century of Painters of the English School, London 1866, p.298.) 

Crossing the Ford was bought by Mulready’s patron Robert Vernon in 1842 for 600 guineas, in three installments, and was given by him to the nation in 1847. There is a related pen and ink drawing in the Henry E. Huntington Art Gallery, San Marino, Italy; a chalk cartoon for the work (now in a private collection) was exhibited at the Royal Academy, London in 1847. On the back of the panel is a sketch for another work on a similar theme by Mulready, The First Voyage 1833 (Bury Art Gallery), which shows a child in a tub being pushed and towed across a stream. 

Arthur A Davis (Fl 1877-1905)

Arthur A Davis, (British fl 1877-1905),

'Uncertain' 

Framed watercolour, signed, 59 x 47cm / 36 x 26cm

Arthur A Davis was well known for his dogs, his name is synonymous with Victorian sporting art. As a set of four, these paintings make a beautiful group, signed and dated by the artist. 

Anonymous.

Annonymous. 

Still Life with Game 

19th Century 96 x 115cm / 120 x 138cm 

SOLD

 

A beautiful example of  19th Century still life oil painting showing game birds and hunting dog in skilful detail and use of colour.  This is the perfect size painting and would make a great statement piece in any room. A very good price for such a large work. 

Japanese Imari Charger Plate Circa. 1850-1860

Japanese Imari Charger Plate 

D 30cm 

Imari porcelain is the name for Japanese porcelain wares made in the town of Arita, in the former Hizen Province, northwestern Kyūshū. They were exported to Europe extensively from the port of Imari, Saga, between the second half of the 17th century and the first half of the 18th century. Imari or Arita porcelain has been continuously produced up through the present day.

Typically the colours used are cobalt blue with red and gold. While subject matter is varied with foliage and flowers, people, genre scenes and pattern.  Most designs are uniquely Japanese owing to the rich Japanese tradition of paintings and costume design. The porcelain has a gritty texture on the bases, where it is not covered by glaze. There is also blue and white Imari. 

Arthur A Davis (1877-1905)

Arthur A Davis, (British fl 1877-1905),

'A Clinking Double'' 

Framed watercolour, signed, 59 x 47cm / 36 x 26cm

£2,950 (Set of Four)

Arthur A Davis was well known for his dogs, his name is synonymous with Victorian sporting art. As a set of four, these paintings make a beautiful group, signed and dated by the artist. 

George Morland (1763-1804)

George Morland (1763-1804)

Bedtime

Oil on Panel, 36 x 28cm / 60 x 52cm 

POA

A touching subject matter and an excellent example of the work of one of Britain's most famous 18th Century painters. George Morland lived a very full and prolific life. He exhibited at the Royal Academy at the very young age of 10, and escaping from his father and taskmaster who apparently kept him virtual prisoner, making him draw and then selling his works and keeping the money, he went to Margate where he continued and developed his taste for a rollicking lifestyle of excess. 

Morland is infamous both for his excesses and for his skill as a draughtsman and his works are extremely sought after and well represented in National museums and private collections.